10k -14k SCRAP GOLD ? UNTESTED c1950s FAIRCHILD AIRCRAFT PILOTS LAPEL PIN For Sale


10k -14k SCRAP GOLD ? UNTESTED  c1950s FAIRCHILD AIRCRAFT  PILOTS  LAPEL PIN

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10k -14k SCRAP GOLD ? UNTESTED c1950s FAIRCHILD AIRCRAFT PILOTS LAPEL PIN:
$37


HANDSOME VINTAGE WW2 SUB-CONTRACTOR FAIRCHILD AIRCRAFT UNTESTED EITHER 10k ,14k, OR GOLD-FILLED . w TWO DIAMONDS PILOT /EMPLOYEE SERVICE AWARD LAPEL PIN . (( 1.86 g )) THIS IS MONOGRAMMED O.L.E. IN FINE CONDITION AND CLASP IN WORKING ORDER . I HAVE HAD THESE PINS BEFORE AND THEY WERE USUALLY MARKED 10k , SO ..SOLD AS IS . $1 START 5 DAYS , .

Fairchild Aircraft, Inc. is an unlikely survivor of the modern aircraft industry. The company was nearly ruined during the 1980s by acrimonious factions within its boardroom and rescued from bankruptcy by investor Carl Albert, but Fairchild emerged as a mere shadow of its former self. The company was once one of America's leading aircraft manufacturers, building a line of successful commercial and military designs.

The original Fairchild company was established in 1936 as a holding company for the aircraft interests of Fairchild Camera founder Sherman Fairchild. While its Ranger Aircraft Engine subsidiary produced engines for the navy, Fairchild participated in the aviation market largely as a subcontractor during World War II. After the war, Fairchild sought new opportunities in the growing aircraft industry, but was hampered by a lack of capital and engineering talent. Nonetheless, the company turned out a successful cargo design called the C-82. It sought to extend its work in this area by developing a second, larger design, the C-119 "Flying Boxcar," but lost the manufacturing competition to the Kaiser-Frazier company. While Fairchild was awarded a subcontract for the C-119 and a subsequent design called the C-123, its employees' resentment for Kaiser was reflected in their work. Furious with Fairchild's performance, the air force virtually shunned the company.

Fairchild turned instead to commercial designs. It established an arrangement with the Dutch airplane builder Fokker to build versions of its popular F-27 airliner. The company also began development of its Goose guided missile system. Unable to sell either design, Fairchild fell into a deep crisis that lasted from 1958 through 1960. Sherman Fairchild returned from retirement to head the company briefly, and was successful in repairing damaged relations with the government and returning financial discipline. He was replaced in 1961 by Edward G. Uhl, an engineer.

Uhl's first actions as head of Fairchild were to fire several executives, slash costs, and switch the company from product diversification to technology diversification. Uhl was convinced that Fairchild's greatest weakness was its lack of engineering talent. Rather than spend years building a capable staff, Uhl began an acquisition campaign that included the Hiller Aircraft Company in 1964. The following year, Uhl found an opportunity to buy a financially distressed manufacturer with an army of good engineers. On September 30, Fairchild took control of the Republic Aviation Corporation, a military aircraft manufacturer based in Farmingdale, on New York's Long Island.

Republic Aviation was founded in 1931 by a Russian immigrant named Alexander P. Seversky. A graduate of the Russian naval academy and military aeronautics school, Seversky learned to fly and during World War I was Russia's leading fighter ace. In 1917, while Seversky was in Washington, D.C. to procure aircraft, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia. Seversky and several in his delegation elected to stay in America.

Seversky worked as a consulting engineer and test pilot, and developed a solid-fuel shore bombardment rocket for the navy. In 1922 he perfected a bomb sight device, which he sold to the U.S. government for $50,000, and used the payment to establish the Seversky Aero Corporation. Rather than building aircraft, Seversky concentrated on improved structures, landing gear, and air-to-air refueling systems.

The Great Depression took a heavier toll on the aviation industry than on others. Seversky's was one of hundreds of aeronautics firms that were forced into bankruptcy in 1931. The company was rescued by the financier Paul Moore, who reorganized the enterprise as Seversky Aircraft Corporation. Moore retained Seversky as president, and took on Alexander Kartveli--an associate of Seversky's and also a Soviet immigrant&mdash an engineer.

Seversky and Kartveli worked feverishly to perfect the concept of a single-skin all-metal aircraft. The result of their work was the SEV-3, a floatplane fitted with retractable wheels. This design failed to win a volume order, but served as a necessary step in developing additional all-metal aircraft. Seversky succeeded in selling a subsequent trainer model, the BT-8, to the government. Lacking a factory, Seversky Aircraft was forced to subcontract its manufacturing business to the Kirkham Engineering Company in Farmingdale, New York.

In 1935 Seversky Aircraft was forced to terminate its manufacturing agreement with Kirkham Engineering when the Colombian government failed to pay an installment. Seversky collected his half-finished aircraft and completed assembling them at an abandoned warehouse nearby. At this site, Seversky began work on the P-35, another derivative of his original design. The P-35 won a government design competition against the Curtiss P-36 Hawk, bringing in a badly needed order for seventy-seven aircraft. Seversky had difficulty overcoming several shortcomings in the P-35, including a jam-prone starter, leaky fuel tanks, and faulty landing gear. The company lost $70,000 on the order and the following year lost an order to Curtiss for 210 additional aircraft.

Seversky's over-enthusiastic drive to sell aircraft, his disdain for Curtiss, and his difficult personality caused his company to become increasingly alienated from the American military establishment. As Seversky's reputation grew, his company's business declined. He was forced to turn to a greater number of export customers, including the Soviet Union and Japan, which held tenuous regard for human rights and even proprietary aircraft designs.

Seversky converted the P-35 to a racer and struck up a relationship with the aviatrix Jacqueline Cochrane in an attempt to win recognition for the aircraft's performance. The design won several races, but failed to win more sales. Most of the government's P-35s were stationed in the Philippines and were later destroyed during the Japanese invasion of that country.

Hoping to reduce his company's reliance on military sales, Seversky spent tremendous sums on the development of a large five-propeller passenger craft. But by 1939 Paul Moore had enough of Seversky. That year, while the founder was on a sales mission to England, the company's beleaguered board of directors voted to oust Seversky and install its own candidate, W. Wallace Kellett, as president of the firm. Seversky was given $80,000 and retired into a more distinguished career as a columnist.

Kellett slashed the payroll from 500 to 185 employees and later won a lucrative Swedish export order. With a $10 million backlog, the company was profitable for the first time. Hoping to rid the company of its bad name, the board voted to change the company's name to Republic Aviation.

Alexander Kartveli remained with the firm and was instrumental in designing its next fighter, the P-47 Thunderbolt. A clear improvement over the lightly armed P-35, the P-47 was the first fighter capable of providing uninterrupted air cover for American bombers between Britain and Germany. As a result, the P-47 secured a leading role for Republic during World War II. Republic Aviation, still located in Farmingdale, grew to employ more than 32,000 workers, a great many of whom were women. By 1944, Republic was turning out 20 P-47s a day.




is$3 east coat USA . $3 to the west coast, Texas, Florida, New Orleans , North/South Carolina and Nevada. USPS . Wait for Invoice from me Buyers Please Note:
Import duties, taxes and charges are not included in the item price or
shipping charges. These charges are the buyers responsibility.
Please check with your country's customs office to determine what
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These charges are normally collected by the delivering freight
(shipping) company or when you pick the item up do not confuse them
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We do not mark merchandise values below value or mark items as gifts.
- US and International government regulations prohibit such behavior.

International Customers Please take note:

Primarily I ship USPS, International first Class. This form of shipping is very economical but it does not offer any tracking information. If you want tracking information with your shipment please contact me and we can arrange for another shipping option.

If you are interested in offerding please contact me and I'll clear you to offer. Thank you.



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